Road to Membership

Do you know if you have a Patriot Ancestor in your family?

Saramana SAR Chapter  Sons of the American Revolution 

Bennington Flag presented to the family of John Curtis

Video of John Curtis Memorial Service


To begin the process, please contact one of our Saramana Helpers.


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Do you have an interest in proving your family bloodline (lineage) to an American Patriot who supported, or fought for our freedom during the American Revolution? The Saramana Chapters Registrar and Genealogist will do what we can to assist you in that effort.

For a List of Links to Other Historical and Genealogical Libraries and Organizations to help in your proving your family bloodline, Click  on "
Links" and scroll to the bottom of the page.

The “process” to become an SAR member can be easy or complicated.

The “process” is much easier IF:

You already know that you have such an ancestor, you know who it is and what he/she did, and you have a family tree that shows all the people in between you and this "Patriot Ancestor”. However, you should not lose heart even if you are not sure whether any of your ancestors lived in America during the Revolution. Many people never fought in the war but supported the American colonists struggle against British domination by supplying financial, public service, medical aid, food, and supplies to support the cause. Searching family history is far easier in this computer age.

The first thing to do is to determine the chain of ancestors connecting you by bloodline (not through adopted children) descent from a Patriot Ancestor. That means that you do not need to know an entire family tree, but just a single line back. Be brave! Even though this chain may be seven to ten generations long and you are not sure that you have a patriot ancestor, there are now large databases of ancestral chains and records showing links between generations (birth certificates, wills, etc., US Census records.) Many genealogical societies, Web sites, and lineage organizations provide assistance with family history searches. The SAR has many volunteer helpers to guide prospective members in their development of a lineage to a patriot ancestor. In many cases, an SAR helper may have resources that are not generally available to the public that will reveal a likely ancestor, promising leads, or additional suggestions of library references to aid in the research.

Copies of the documents that support this lineage must accompany the application. This means finding documents linking parents to children through seven to nine generations, so it may seem rather overwhelming. However, the task can be much simpler; especially the information is already on file with the SAR or DAR (from an earlier application). In that case, you need not submit it again, but can simply refer to the earlier application.

The easiest course is for the applicant who has a relative that is or was a member of the Sons of the American Revolution or the Daughters of the American Revolution. When an Applicant becomes interested in finding his ancestry, he should check with his mother, father, grandmother, or grandfather to see if they have already proven the bloodline back to the Patriot. You should also check with bloodline uncles, aunts, and even cousins on the side of the family that leads to the patriot.

To start your application process, please be prepared to provide your SAR helper with copies of documentation on your most recent three generations, starting with yourself. Your birth certificate and marriage certificate if you have children that might want to become members in the future. For your parents and grandparents, your helper will need copies of birth certificates, marriage certificates, and death certificates.

Your birth certificate links you to your parents, your parent’s birth certificate links them to their parents, and your grandparent’s birth certificates link them to their parents. The more of this information you can provide, the easier it will be for your SAR helper to prepare your application.

SAR Junior membership is also available for young men under 18 years of age. They will receive a membership certificate and a national membership number. They may join in all SAR events except voting and serving as an elected officer or committee chairman. They may serve on some committees, wear the colonial uniform, and march with the Color Guard. We encourage their membership and involvement. The application has the same requirements to prove lineage. Many times, they use the father or grandfather's application for proof of lineage. Mother or grandmother's DAR application is also acceptable proof of lineage.

The “process” is much harder and more complicated IF:

You do NOT know if you have a Patriot Ancestor, do NOT have a family tree, and might NOT even know who your great grandparents were. However, you should not lose heart even if you are not sure whether any of your ancestors lived in America during the Revolution. Many people never fought in the war but supported the American colonists struggle against British domination by supplying financial, public service, medical aid, food, and supplies to support the cause. Searching family history is far easier in this computer age.
 
The first thing to do is to determine the chain of ancestors connecting you by bloodline (not through adopted children) descent from a Patriot Ancestor. That means that you do not need to know an entire family tree, but just a single line back. Be brave! Even though this chain may be seven to ten generations long and you are not sure that you have a patriot ancestor, there are now large databases of ancestral chains and records showing links between generations (birth certificates, wills, etc., US Census records.) Many genealogical societies, Web sites, and lineage organizations provide assistance with family history searches. The SAR has many volunteer helpers to guide prospective members in their development of a lineage to a patriot ancestor. In many cases, an SAR helper may have resources that are not generally available to the public that will reveal a likely ancestor, promising leads, or additional suggestions of library references to aid in the research.

Copies of the documents that support this lineage must accompany the application. This means finding documents linking parents to children through seven to nine generations, so it may seem rather overwhelming.

To start your application process, please be prepared to provide your SAR helper with copies of documentation on your most recent three generations, starting with yourself. Your birth certificate and marriage certificate if you have children that might want to become members in the future. For your parents and grandparents, your helper will need copies of birth certificates, marriage certificates, and death certificates.

Your birth certificate links you to your parents, your parent’s birth certificate links them to their parents, and your grandparent’s birth certificates link them to their parents. The more of this information you can provide, the easier it will be for your SAR helper to prepare your application.

To view the Membership Categories, Application Fees and Dues, and filing instructions, click
HERE.


The following is the story of Debbie McMurry, the wife of Saramana Member Vic McMurry and mother of Saramana member Scott McMurry. It is the story of her struggles to prove she had a Patriot Ancestor.

When I first started this journey, I believed all soldiers and supporters were listed on websites or printed in “old” books, but as I found out my first ancestor was not! In fact, the entire Connecticut Militia 4th Regiment was not. My patriot’s surname was Curtis, his first name was John. There are over twenty men named John Curtis listed on the National Society Sons of the American Revolution Patriot and Grave Listing. All with different Patriot Ancestor Numbers.


I began my search over 10 years ago with my maternal side. I very quickly discovered all of them came to America during the early 1800’s…Irish and Danish. Believing my paternal side was of the same era, I just tinkered with the idea of early American roots. Then Ancestry.com helped me to find my father’s family in the early censuses. My grandmother was entered with her nick name, Mammie!! Fortunately I knew her first name was Mary. Unfortunately the search went cold. I Googled more websites and found Family Search. This website is affiliated with the Church of the Latter Day Saints. Much of the info on Family Search is at your fingertips on your computer at home, but what I needed was not. The film I requested was Manhattan (New York City) marriage records, 1866-1937; index to all boroughs, 1866-1937. My grandparent’s names were entered incorrectly as Hancok and Vaneps, actual spelling is Hancox and Van Epps.

Finally the day came when I was sitting in a very cold viewing room, searching through the couples who were married around the time of 1903. I found my grandparents! I quickly made a copy to use as the first step to my application. I then ordered my father’s birth certificate from Vital Statistics in Trenton, New Jersey. With the knowledge my grandmother was descended from the Dutch, I dearly hoped I could find more!

Years after the discovery of my grandmother’s maiden name and numerous rejections from DAR regarding the Van Epps line, I pursued my grandmother Mary’s history to her grandmother’s paternal side; Curtis. With each step upward in my family tree, I found “bread crumbs” to the previous generation. With the help of three researchers I was able to uncover information not recorded on any websites. The last a final researcher took only four hours to find my 4th great grandfather’s true identity. He was not listed on any website. Her name was Lisa Burghardt (Historian for Easton, Connecticut). She found him in the archives of the Connecticut State Library. Lisa proved where he lived; she also uncovered the Revolutionary War payrolls where John and his fellow soldiers were listed. The payroll showed men from the North Fairfield Parish, Lisa had to prove to DAR not only where John lived (deeds), but where his regiment lived also. With the preponderance of evidence Lisa uncovered, I was accepted to the Daughters of the American Revolution. Using my DAR Application, our son Scott now has a Supplemental SAR Membership for John Curtis.

Because it might be harder and more complicated to prove your Patriot Ancestor, just means you have to work harder so you can stand taller and proud. My wife made a promise to John to travel to his cemetery in New York State and place the SAR grave marker on his tombstone. On July 22, 2015, the Town of Milton gave John Curtis a Veteran’s ceremony of which I have never in my life seen or been a witness to. The Program, the Proclamations, the Citations and the video tell it all. Maybe someday, you can have the same results.


Please note that the Documents listed below will REQUIRE  that you have and use the latest version of the “FREEAdobe Reader.

For more information on obtaining and using Adobe Reader, please click on
Using PDF Files.